7 Tips to Help You Teach Point of View to Upper Elementary Students

reading Dec 13, 2022
7 Tips to Help You Teach Point of View to Upper Elementary Students

Teaching point of view to upper elementary students can be a challenging task, but it is also an important skill for students to learn in order to become effective writers and readers. Point of view refers to the perspective from which a story is told, and understanding this concept can help students better analyze and understand the texts they read and write. Here are some strategies and activities you can use to teach point of view to your upper elementary students.

Using Mentor Texts

Introduce the concept of point of view by reading a story or excerpt from a book that has a clear point of view. As you read, pause and ask students to identify whose perspective the story is being told from. You can also ask students to consider how the story might be different if it were told from a different perspective.

Graphic Organizers

Use visual aids to help students understand points of view. For example, you can create a chart or graphic organizer that shows the different points of view (e.g. first person, second person, third person limited, third person omniscient). You can also use pictures or other visual aids to help students understand the difference between first person (told from the perspective of "I") and third person (told from the perspective of "he" or "she").

Practice Through Reading

Have students identify the point of view in texts they are reading. As students read, ask them to identify the point of view and explain how they determined it. You can also have students look for clues in the text, such as using first or third person pronouns, to help them determine their point of view.

Practice Through Writing

Practice writing from different points of view. Have students choose a topic or story and write it from different points of view. For example, students could write a story about a dog from the perspective of the dog, the owner, or an outsider. This activity can help students understand how the point of view affects the way a story is told.

You can also have students create their own stories or narratives and choose a point of view. Encourage students to think about how the point of view they choose will affect the way their story is told.

Impact on a Story

Discuss how point of view can impact the way a story is told. Ask students to consider how the point of view can affect the way a character is portrayed and the events of the story. For example, if a story is told from the perspective of a villain, the villain's actions may seem justified or even heroic, while the same actions might seem evil if told from the perspective of a hero.

Role Play or Acting

Use role-play or acting to help students understand different points of view. Have students act out a scene or story from different points of view. This can help students see how the perspective of the narrator can impact the way a story is told.

Using Digital Activities

Using digital activities can be a great way to practice point of view with upper elementary students. There are a variety of online resources and interactive games that can help students identify and understand different points of view. For example, students can play point of view games that involve reading a passage or story and determining the point of view. There are also online quizzes and worksheets that students can complete to practice identifying points of view in different texts. Digital activities are an engaging and convenient way for students to practice this important skill, and they can be easily incorporated into a blended learning environment or used as a supplement to traditional classroom instruction. Click here to check out my first and third person point of view pixel art activity.

In conclusion, teaching point of view to upper elementary students can be a challenging but rewarding task. By using a variety of strategies and activities, such as reading texts with clear points of view, using visual aids, practicing writing from different points of view, and acting out stories from different perspectives, you can help your students develop a strong understanding of this important concept. With practice and guidance, your students will become more confident and proficient writers and readers, able to effectively analyze and understand the texts they encounter.