9 Tips for Teaching Upper Elementary Students to Write Nonfiction Summaries

reading Dec 27, 2022
9 Tips for Teaching Upper Elementary Students to Write Nonfiction Summaries

Teaching upper elementary students how to write nonfiction summaries is an important skill that can help them in a variety of contexts, both inside and outside of the classroom. Summaries allow students to identify the main ideas and key details of a nonfiction text and to communicate that information in a concise and organized way. Here are some tips for teaching upper elementary students to write effective nonfiction summaries:

Summary Introduction

Start by introducing the concept of summarizing and its importance. Explain to students that summaries are a way to condense a large amount of information into a shorter, more manageable form. Emphasize that summaries are useful for a variety of purposes, such as taking notes, preparing for a test, or sharing information with others.

Modeling

Model the process of summarizing for students. Choose a nonfiction text and read it aloud to the class. Then, identify the main ideas and key details of the text and create a summary using those elements. Be sure to keep the summary concise and focus on the most important information.

Independent Practice

Have students practice summarizing independently. Provide students with a selection of nonfiction texts and have them summarize the texts in their own words. Encourage them to use their own voice and to focus on the main ideas and key details.

Class Review

Review the summaries with the class and discuss any common mistakes or areas for improvement. Offer feedback and suggestions for improvement, and encourage students to revise their summaries as needed.

Practice Summarizing in Different Contexts

In addition to summarizing written texts, have students practice summarizing spoken presentations, lectures, or other audio or video sources. This will help students develop the skills they need to summarize information from a variety of sources.

Graphic Organizers

Encourage students to use graphic organizers to help them organize their summaries. There are many different types of graphic organizers that can be used for summarizing, such as concept maps, Venn diagrams, and flow charts. These tools can help students identify the main ideas and key details of a text and organize that information in a clear and logical way.

Specific Guidelines

Provide students with specific guidelines for writing summaries. Depending on the purpose and audience for their summaries, students may need to follow different guidelines. For example, a summary for a test might be more concise and focused on key details, while a summary for a presentation might be more conversational and include more context and background information. Make sure students understand the purpose and audience for their summaries, and provide them with specific guidelines to follow.

Revising and Editing

Encourage students to revise and edit their summaries. Summarizing is a complex process that requires students to think critically and make decisions about what information is most important. Encourage students to review and revise their summaries to make sure they are clear, concise, and accurately represent the content of the original text.

Apply to the Real World

Help students apply their summarizing skills in real-world situations. Encourage students to use their summarizing skills in a variety of contexts, such as writing book reports, giving presentations, or preparing for class discussions. This will help students see the value of summarizing and give them the opportunity to practice and improve their skills.

Overall, teaching upper elementary students to write nonfiction summaries is an important skill that can help them in a variety of contexts. By modeling the summarizing process, providing opportunities for practice, and encouraging revision and editing, teachers can help students develop the skills they need to effectively summarize nonfiction texts.